The Blog


Decisions are pivotal to all aspects of life and business. We make multiple decisions each day whether we realize it or not. There are obvious choices and those that we mull over, discuss and second guess. Is now the time to add a new piece of video equipment or online tools to enhance our social media efforts? New employees? Then there are those that get made on autopilot with not much thought at all such as setting a deadline for a project. Each is impactful and often times those that seem small have the greatest impact.

2012_05_VisionDecisions can certainly provide a level of anxiety especially when multiple people are involved and financial well-being or investment are part of the equation. That’s where it becomes imperative that the end goal and vision of the business remain the central focus. Far too often, personal preference tends to creep in and disrupt the decision making process. Not that personal preference should be eliminated from the discussion, but if it’s contrary to the overall vision then it need not be applied.

I observed a situation recently where a team was put in place to evaluate a member of an organization. The team members were responsible for providing feedback. However, all feedback was made available to the individual. This lack of a filter created a destructive environment that resulted because one team member provided feedback that was weighted more toward personal preference. The ensuing discussion and end result was not healthy for the company at all.

Listening to multiple viewpoints and ideas is critical when it comes to employee buy-in and decision making. This buy-in is as important as anything for a number of reasons. It should be a major priority and goes hand-in-hand with clearly laying out the vision. This ensures that each employee and partner is on the same page. If that’s been accomplished, the process of generating productive and constructive feedback has begun. Feedback that will help propel the business in the right direction.

Opinions and personal preference are important, but not when they compromise the integrity of the overall vision. Keep those out of the decision making process as much as possible.